March 30, 2010

Scriptoria Blog

CABI and the psyllids

We’ve been checking out the new website of CABI, a well-known organisation that applies scientific solutions to solve problems in agriculture and the environment, and it’s pretty impressive - just the type of clean, clear layout we like.The interactive map in the development and research section is really neat. It uses Google’s maps, so all you have to do is click on a location marker and up pops the CABI project at that location. Click on the Read More chevrons and a new window tells you all about the project in clear, easy-to-follow sections.

CABI has quite a pedigree; it celebrates its first 100 years this year and is still leading the way in its field. A good example that appealed to us on its home page is CABI’s use of an insect known as a psyllid. Following research by CABI, psyllids are to be released in the UK to combat the marauding Japanese knotweed, which has no natural predators in the UK and is causing havoc in waterways and gardens and damaging structures (yes, it can even bring down bridges).

All in all, the site is great for seeing what CABI is up to in different parts of the world and it gives a clear run-down of the microbial services and publications that CABI has on offer. To look for yourself, go to http://www.cabi.org.

All the best
The Scriptoria Team

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Scriptoria Blog

Message in a wallet

Here at Scriptoria, we believe that clear messages are vital to good communications and repeating those messages whenever you get the chance really helps hammer home what you are trying to say.So, when developing communications strategies for DFID, we were thrilled to come across someone already practising what we preach. This head of department had brainstormed with his staff to come up with five key messages about their work, then everybody carried around print-outs of those messages in their wallets, handbags or pockets,to remind themselves of them in their everyday working lives.

Great story, I thought. I wonder if he still remembers those messages? Well, here’s the proof: eight years on, he could still summarise them and produced the well used sheets from his wallet as proof.

So, a top tip from someone it worked for - try the wallet trick (or the handbag trick). You could even try printing short messages on something the size of a credit card.

All the best,

Sandy

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